Canyonlands

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Canyonlands

Canyonlands seemed  otherworldly.  I hiked up onto a sandstone dome  called Whale Rock and I turned around and around, gazing as far as my eyes could see.  Except for the small section of parking lot visible right below, I could see no other signs of human activity.  If the national park system was founded to preserve “wild America”, this was what it was all about.

The park is enormous and is separated into three distinct land districts by the juncture of the Green River and the Colorado River.  If you imagine the shape of a lower case letter “y”, the Green River flows southeast to join the Colorado River.  Each district has its own personality and you can not cross directly from one section of the park into the other.  Our family visited the section called “Island in the Sky”.  What a perfect name!  It is an enormous mesa accessible by a narrow neck of land.  The sides of the mesa are sheer, dropping about 1000 feet to a lower plateau, which then drops about 1000 feet to the river basin.

1000 feet drop separates plateaus

 

 

At one time cattle and sheep were raised upon the mesa.  Containing the livestock would certainly be easy, but feeding them would be a different matter altogether.  A ranger at the visitor’s center gave us a brief overview of edible plants of Canyonlands.  Believe me, it was very brief.  A meal might be made of pine nuts, prickly pear cactus, and juniper berries, then washed down with Mormon tea, which is a stimulant and powerful diuretic. Um, no thanks.

The Canyonlands diet

 

There are two other land districts in the park.  The Needles, which lies to the southeast, has paved roads, a visitor’s center, and established hiking trails.  Its skyline is characterized by jagged sandstone pillars, hence the name.

Monument Basin with the Needles in distant left

The other district, the Maze, is not for the faint-hearted or ill-prepared.  It is accessible only by rugged roads for four-wheel-drive, high clearance vehicles.  There are no facilities whatsoever, and the trails are primitive.  The park literature stresses that the Maze is only for those experienced and self-reliant.  “Be prepared to self rescue.”  Self rescue?! While that notion opens up a huge theological can of worms, I think the rangers have in mind a willingness to hack off your own  boulder-trapped arm with a pocket knife, so that you can rappel to the canyon floor and hike to rescue.  Hey, it’s been done.

The Maze lies beyond the Green River

 

We chose to visit Island in the Sky because it was the most accessible by car, offering many viewing areas to enjoy and short hikes for all the children.  My children were awestruck by Upheaval Dome, an unusual rock formation that may actually be a meteorite impact crater.

View from Upheaval Rock

Awesome view

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From Upheaval Dome

 

The family favorite, though, was the Mesa Arch Trail.  This trail can be enjoyed on so many levels.  The easy path has abundant desert wildflowers and interesting rock formations.

Mesa Arch viewed from afar

The Mesa Arch is, itself, lovely.

Mesa Arch

If you look through the arch, you see the Washer Woman Arch.  See how there appears to be a woman leaning over her wash bucket?

Washer Woman Arch

And beyond there is a breath-taking view of the snow-capped La Sal Mountains.

La Sal Mountains through Mesa Arch

Hiking companions

What climbs up must climb down...

What is noteworthy about this last picture is what is not in view.  To the left there was a tall, slender woman.  She was barefoot and dressed in yoga clothes.  She and her photographer spent an enormous amount of time composing her picture.  They would adjust the camera, test the settings, adjust the camera.  Finally she stepped in front of the camera and bent over into a back bend.  What took me by surprise was how she groaned, and moaned, and grunted!  She would check the photos, then unsatisfied with the result, she would strike the pose again, complete with grunts and groans.  I think she was trying to replicate the gentle curve  of the arch.  She looked anything but graceful.  In fact, her face was turning purple from the effort.  I dare say she is the only one who wasn’t enjoying the view.

I am ENJOYING the view!

Comments (0) Jun 16 2011